Are The Last Green Valley’s Streams Healthy? You Can Help Us Find Out!

Each fall, dozens of volunteers gather important water quality information by collecting, sorting, and identifying underwater bugs from small streams in eastern Connecticut. Through this program, called, “Riffle Bioassessments for Volunteers (RBV),” we can learn a lot about water quality in these fragile stream environments by knowing what bugs live in the water. Some of these bugs, primarily stone flies, may flies and caddis flies (trout food!), have a low tolerance for pollution, so when you find lots of different kinds in a stream, then you know that water quality is good.

If you like to go on outdoor treasure hunts, sign up to learn more about the RBV program! Jean Pillo, The Last Green Valley’s Water Quality Monitoring Coordinator, will present a class about the RBV program, followed by an actual stream sampling experience. You can choose between two free training opportunities: September 8 at the USDA Service Center, 238 West Town Street, Norwich; or September 9 at the Connecticut Audubon Society Center, 218 Day Road, Pomfret. Both programs will run from 9 – noon.  Preregistration is required by calling 860-928-4948 ext. 605, or by emailing Jean.Pillo@Comcast.net. Once trained, new volunteers will be paired up with experienced team leaders to sample bugs from assigned streams. Results from previous years’ collecting, including a link to an interactive map, can be viewed online at www.ct.gov/deep/rbv. Sign up for this program, become a Citizen Scientist, and help TLGV put more stars on the map!

The Last Green Valley is a National Heritage Corridor – the last stretch of dark night sky in the coastal sprawl between Boston and Washington, D.C.  The Last Green Valley works for you in the National Heritage Corridor. Together we can care for it, enjoy it and pass it on